How Much Did WACs Earn in WWII? . . . and What Were the WAC Grades?

WAC grades & pay 1944 Daughter WAC (1)
Source: Someone to be Proud of: Your Daughter in the WAC (1944)

I’m still trying to figure why Aunt Marian had a box of military badges—and what units the badges represent. But I have determined that some of them represent various WAC ranks.

I found this chart in a 1944 recruiting publication aimed at parents, called Someone to be Proud Of: Your Daughter in the WAC, which not only shows the grades, but also the monthly pay received at each level. Who won’t want to join the WACs when they get $50 a month in “spending money”?

WAC badges in Aunt Marian’s Collection

WAC Badges: Technician Fifth Grade
Technician Fifth Grade (Pay=$66 per month)
WAC Badges--Technician Third Grade and Technician Fourth Grade
Top left and bottom: Technician, Fourth Grade (pay==$78); Top right: Technician, Third Grade (pay=$96 per month)
WAC badge-staff sargent
Staff Sergeant (Pay=$96 per month)


 

22 thoughts on “How Much Did WACs Earn in WWII? . . . and What Were the WAC Grades?”

    1. Thanks for sharing the link to your wonderful history of the WACs. It provides so much really good information, and I really like the recruiting poster that you used to illustrate it. I’m always impressed by the amount of research that you do.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Of course, things cost much less back then, too. I vaguely remember twenty-five cent bread and 35 cent gas. I do remember that my first apartment rented for $175/mon. So, $50 month for spending money might have been ok, depending on whether everything else truly was covered.

    Like

  2. Very interesting! I still think the women got paid too little for their service. Our son has a very interesting small collection of badges he got from US special forces guys deployed in Somalia in the early 1990s when we were vacationing in Kenya. He was playing with his GI Joes at the poolside and made friends with many of these tough guys who also came to the same hotel for their R&R. He reminded them of their own little kids back home.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s